Assessment

François Schuiten

ASSIGNMENTS

  • Portfolio of weekly course blog entries, responses to readings, and comments (best 10)
  • Short quizzes: questions based on course blog entries (best 5, out of 6)
  • Midterm examination (in-class, 45 minutes): critical essay on one text
    NB: You MAY bring the course texts with you to the exam, including any notes/sticky notes that you’ve added: but no other materials (course notes, dictionaries, reference works, electronic devices)
  • Final project and poster-session (groups of 2-3)
  • Final examination (2.5 hours):
    1 question on your project (25% of exam mark)
    + 1 comparative essay on at least two texts (75% of exam mark)
    NB: You MAY bring the course texts with you to the exam, including any notes/sticky notes that you’ve added: but no other materials (course notes, dictionaries, reference works, electronic devices)

Weekly advance preparation and passages for close reading will be posted on this present UBC Blogs site in advance of each class, as will be assignments: in the menu above. Outlines for each class will appear after the event. (There will also be a link to this site from the WebCT Vista one.)

GRADING

Blogging portfolio 15%
Quizzes (in class) 10%
Group project and poster 20%
Midterm (in class) 20%
Final examination 35%

GRADING CRITERIA

  • Grading Guidelines for Content-Based Courses (Department of French, Hispanic and Italian Studies, UBC)
  • Critical analysis: grading criteria (O’Brien)
  • As this is a literature/culture course, most of your grade is for
    • content (your own idea and interpretation) and
    • structure (good choice of examples, relevance, an intelligent reading, well-reasoned, solid argument, acceptable conclusions with regard to all of the above).
  • Style, syntax, grammar, and spelling will contribute to the grade, insofar as they contribute to the communication of content and structure: bear in mind that this is an exercise in EXPLANATION which will be assisted by clear EXPRESSION.
  • While some critics, theorists, etc. may make occasional passing appearances in our course: note that this course’s focus is on primary texts and YOUR close reading of them. There will never be a pop quiz, vocabulary test, or “who’s who” multiple-choice exercise on this sort of thing (which is a good thing, but just not our present business).
  • Please don’t cheat. It’s not good, it’s not nice, and it’s no fun for anyone.
  • Proper citation is of course permitted, and a different beast from plagiarism. Do consult University policies further on this point; if in doubt, contact your professor and discuss.
  • See further: RESOURCES CRITICAL
  • See even further still: NBBB optional… to see matters from the other side, for examples of what not to do, and out of sheer mischief:

SEE ALSO:


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