Syllabus

PDF of the syllabus & schedule

Monday, Wednesday, & Friday 12.00 noon – 1.00 p.m. Buchanan B213

grammatica-3INSTRUCTOR

Juliet O’Brien
Assistant Professor
Department of French, Hispanic and Italian Studies
Office: Buchanan Tower 728
Office hours: Tuesday & Wednesday 2.00 – 4.00 p.m. and by email appointment
Email: juliet(dot)obrien(at)ubc(dot)ca

GENERAL COURSE DESCRIPTION

RMST 221: LITERATURES AND CULTURES OF THE ROMANCE WORLD I:
MEDIEVAL TO EARLY MODERN is an introduction to the main themes that shaped the Western part of Europe as its different national identities emerged in the Mediterranean sphere.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
“INTRIGUE”: 2011-12, winter term 2 (January-April 2012)

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François Schuiten

Conspiracy, plots and plotting, manoeuvrings and machinations, gossip and rumour, tale-telling and the telling of tales.

Our central theme brings together ideas familiar to the 21st-century reader, viewed through the lens of some of the finest and most intriguing pre-Modern texts, originally written in France, Italy, and Spain in the 12th to 17th centuries; texts that are also an important influence on later European and world literatures, and that span a range of forms: short stories and their collection, romance, the treatise and other didactic works, parody, the picaresque.

Allied topics of crime, mystery, and the playing of games open up further issues of writing, rewriting, reading, and commentary: this course will involve elements of literary detection.

All texts will be worked on in English translation, though students will of course have the option of using versions in the original (or a modernized variant) in their final projects.

PREREQUISITES: None

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION: English

WHAT WE’LL READ

For this is a course that is very much about reading …

REQUIRED READING

  • Marie de France.
    Lais
    (e-text): online Web. U of Florida, 1993
  • Guillaume de Lorris & Jean de Meun, trans. Frances Horgan. The Romance of the Rose (Oxford World’s Classics)
    ISBN 978-0199540679
  • Baldassare Castiglione, trans. George Bull.
    The Book of the Courtier
    (Penguin Classics)
    ISBN 978-0140441925
    [NB this edition lists the author’s first name as “Baldesar”]
  • Niccolò Machiavelli, trans. Peter Bondanella. The Prince (Oxford World’s Classics)
    ISBN 978-0199535699
  • Fernando de Rojas, trans. Lesley Byrd Simpson.
    The Celestina
    (University of California Press)
    ISBN 978-0520250116
  • Marguerite de Navarre, trans. Paul Chilton.
    Heptameron
    (Penguin Classics)
    ISBN 978-0140443554
  • Anon and Francisco de Quevedo, trans. Michael Alpert.
    Lazarillo de Tormes and The Swindler: Two Spanish Picaresque Novels
    (Penguin Classics)
    ISBN 978-0140449006
  • Course site on UBC Blogs [i.e. here], including supplementary reading list for student presentations and projects.
  • Further online resources will be provided on this UBC Blogs site: Medieval, Renaissance, and Early Modern sites and metasites; suggested reference works and style guides; and links to electronic projects, museum websites, and virtual galleries.
    https://rmst221in2011to12.wordpress.com/
    (free)

All (except the free online texts) are available from the UBC Bookstore.

SEE NEXT:

[Printable version of syllabus, schedule, and allied materials available on request. All contents subject to change.]

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Optional extra reading, for pre-course preparation: “The Hour of the Pig” (1993)

For further suggestions on pertinent viewing material, please see Meta-meta-medieval: filmography.

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